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News Filed Under Water

A faucet with water flowing.
July 1, 2020 - Filed Under: Children and Parenting, Creating Healthy Indoor Childcare Environments, Water, Sip Safe

Two simple, daily steps can protect Mississippi’s youngest citizens from lead poisoning. Jason Barrett, an assistant Extension professor in the Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute, said lead in drinking water can harm children’s health. But flushing faucets each morning and using cold water for cooking and preparing baby bottles can greatly reduce exposure.

February 21, 2020 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Irrigation, Precision Agriculture, Water

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The Mississippi State University Extension Service will offer multiple opportunities March 3-5 for Delta row-crop producers to get help with an important irrigation planning tool.

November 1, 2019 - Filed Under: Healthy Water Practices, Water Quality

Thirty-five percent of Mississippi’s private drinking wells test positive for bacteria, which makes testing and remediation key health issues for the state.

October 10, 2019 - Filed Under: Environment, Water Quality

Landowners and conservation professionals can learn about pastureland conservation practices during an Oct. 25 farm tour.

Three men stand beside a white sign on a cloudless day. The sign reads “Delta Research & Extension Center, West Farm, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Mississippi State University.”
February 20, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Water Quality

 A new research center in the Mississippi Delta is tasked with studying agricultural water management to protect this critical natural resource.

A harvested field spans out with trees lining the right edge and far side on a sunny day.
February 15, 2019 - Filed Under: Environment, Fisheries, Water Quality

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- In past decades, researchers have revealed many connections between water bodies and adjacent landscapes. Much attention has been given to how soil, water, nutrients, pollutants -- and energy, in general -- move from land to nearby water bodies in runoff.

Illustration shows plants growing above water’s surface with root system below.
December 7, 2018 - Filed Under: Fisheries, Water

Floating islands are increasingly popular as a way to provide attractive centerpieces in ponds while improving water quality.

From the shore, floating islands look like normal earthen islands covered in plants, but they are much more than that. They are hydroponic systems that, when fully colonized by growing plants, are essentially wetlands that float on the water’s surface and provide many of the same services as natural wetlands.

A wooden pole with hash marks at 12, 18 and 24 inches from a round disk with alternating black and white quadrants rests on brown grass. Danger is written below the 12-inch hash, ideal is written in the middle section, and fertilize is written above the 24-inch hash.
October 5, 2018 - Filed Under: Fisheries, Water

If you own one of the 160,000 ponds in Mississippi, chances are you have invested tremendous amounts of cash and time in this resource. Building a pond can cost tens of thousands of dollars, and fish stocking, liming, fertilization and weed control are not cheap either.

Tall grass grows between a calm body of water and low-cut grass with a wooden pier in the background.
September 28, 2018 - Filed Under: Environment, Fisheries, Water Quality, Wildlife

Salt marshes are coastal wetlands common throughout the globe and visible just about any time you drive over a bridge along the coast.

Large water-filled ditch rests between a dirt road and a field of green corn stalks.
August 17, 2018 - Filed Under: Water, Water Quality

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Summer brings many activities: swimming in pools, recreation in Mississippi’s waterways, washing vehicles after traveling down dirt roads, and irrigating millions of acres of gardens and fields. These and many other activities rely on abundant water.

Putting a dollar value on clean water is difficult. Everyone uses it in their daily lives for drinking and domestic needs, but we also use water through the products we consume. This hidden flow of water is less obvious, so it’s often given less attention when we talk about water conservation.

Water flows from a stainless steel kitchen faucet into a clear drinking glass.
August 2, 2018 - Filed Under: Food Safety, Health, Healthy Water Practices, Water, Water Quality

Practical actions that can reduce lead in drinking water are highlights of a recently concluded multistate project.

July 26, 2018 - Filed Under: Water, Mississippi Well Owner Network, Water Quality

Private well workshops in four counties this fall will help homeowners improve their drinking water sources.

More than a dozen young people listen to a teacher while they stand on a cement bridge overlooking a large ditch.
July 13, 2018 - Filed Under: Environment, Water

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- It's that time of year when many parts of the state really need a good rain. Afternoon pop-up storms often bring torrential downpours that drop a couple of inches of rain in less than an hour, instead of the perfect, slow showers we need.

April 3, 2018 - Filed Under: Water, Rural Water Association, Water Quality

LEAKESVILLE, Miss. -- South Mississippi homeowners with private wells will have an opportunity next month to learn how to improve the functionality of their drinking water sources.

The Mississippi Well Owner Network, a program of the Mississippi State University Extension Service, will hold a workshop at the Extension office in Greene County May 8 at 2 p.m.

A pile of large gray rocks stretches across a ditch in a country setting.
March 16, 2018 - Filed Under: Environment, Water Quality

This time of year seems to be a never-ending battle with Mother Nature. As the rain pours down, water levels in ditches, creeks, rivers and storm drains rise rapidly, increasing flood risk in urban and rural areas.

Man waters garden flowers from a water hose.
March 9, 2018 - Filed Under: Environment, Water

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- How much water do we use each day? This may sound like a simple question until we consider the direct and indirect ways we use water.

Direct water use includes the indoor and outdoor water that we physically use when we turn on a faucet in our bathrooms, kitchens or gardens. It is what most of us think of when we are asked how much water we use, but the truth is that we consume a lot of water indirectly too.

A drainage pipe, with stones leading to the creek bed, emptying into Catalpa Creek.
December 8, 2017 - Filed Under: Environment, Water

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- All of us live in a particular town, county, state and country. Just as importantly, we also live in a specific watershed.

Everyone on earth resides in and interacts with a watershed on a daily basis. Watersheds are natural landscape boundaries that define an area that drains into a stream, river, lake, reservoir or ocean. Watersheds can range from a few acres to thousands of square miles. They are also nested, meaning smaller watersheds make up larger watersheds.

Plastic debris is seen in an open black trash bag sitting on the beach at the 2016 Mississippi Coastal Cleanup.
October 10, 2017 - Filed Under: Community, Environment, Fisheries, Waste Management, Water

How much trash does your family generate? How much of that trash is single-use plastic, like water bottles and food packaging?

You might be surprised to know that much of that plastic ends up littering our waterways, beaches and oceans. In fact, the No. 1 item polluting these areas is plastic.

September 21, 2017 - Filed Under: Water Quality, Nuisance Wildlife and Damage Management, Operation HOG, White-Tailed Deer

Wild hogs cost Mississippians millions of dollars each year, but landowners stand to lose more than money if the nuisance animals’ range and population continue to grow. 

Left unchecked, wild hogs have the potential to steal property owners’ investments and cripple the state’s ecosystem in the process. 

September 15, 2017 - Filed Under: Community, Mississippi Well Owner Network, Rural Water Association, Water Quality

BATESVILLE, Miss. -- Private well owners in seven Delta counties can get water samples pH tested and screened for bacteria and lead at an educational workshop in Batesville. 

The Mississippi State University Extension Service is cohosting a free well-owner workshop at the Extension office in Panola County Oct. 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. 

Residents of Panola, Tallahatchie, Sunflower, Bolivar, Leflore, Quitman and Coahoma counties can get their private well water screened for free. The workshop is open to all well owners. Attendance is not required to participate in the water testing.  

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