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News Filed Under Flower Gardens

A basket holds an assortment of red, yellow and green peppers.
May 3, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens

The month of May signals that it’s time for me to start planting culinary peppers in my home garden.

Freshly mowed lawn.
April 29, 2021 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Plant Diseases, Trees, Vegetable Gardens

As warmer weather creeps in, many people find themselves spending more time outdoors and working in their yards. If you’re like me, you’ve probably made a trip or two to your local garden center looking for plants and other garden necessities. After reading over May’s garden checklist, it looks like you may need to make a few more trips. Here are some tasks to check off this month. 

Plants grow from wooden boxes that have an overhead, curved pipe system.
April 28, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens

Mississippi’s long growing season means potential gardeners have until at least July to start growing vegetables, but the state’s ideal gardening climate also means weeds and pests are constant threats. Gardeners often grow flowers in containers to add pops of color and spots of greenery in otherwise unworkable areas, and they can be equally successful using containers to grow vegetables.

A low-growing plant with tiny leaves grows in a large pot.
April 26, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

When looking at all the plants growing in landscapes, I’m reminded that each plant has a role in the story of that garden. And most garden stories have plants with sidekicks that you always find side by side.

A garden story that I recently enjoyed was the British TV show, “Rosemary & Thyme.” Rosemary Boxer (a university lecturer) and Laura Thyme (a former police officer) were a dynamic duo in the garden. They solved mysteries -- mostly murders -- while working as gardeners in beautiful landscapes all across Europe.

April 22, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

It’s that time of the year when people are on the hunt for the perfect container plant combos. It’s tempting to head to the local garden center, pick out the best-looking flowers, and plant them with wild abandon. However, planning is an important part of the gardening process. Before you go to the garden center, decide where you want to put your container. This will help you purchase the right flowers for the space.

A clump of plants has trimmed tops and exposed roots.
April 19, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

Many of Mississippi’s perennial landscape plants will start to decline after several years. That means they will have smaller foliage and won’t flower as much, even though they’ve been well cared for with regular fertilizer and irrigation.

Tiny pink blooms emerge along a green spike.
April 12, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

It’s no secret that I’m a real fan of salvia. A couple of weeks ago, I enjoyed highlighting sage, which is a great culinary salvia. This week I’m going talk about perennial salvia, another group of these great plants.

A single, green cucumber hangs on a vine.
April 5, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens

If you read this Southern Gardening column frequently, you realize that I grow much more than pretty flowers in my home garden. Besides ornamental plants, I love to grow vegetables that my wife and I can enjoy for dinner.

Four images of sage are pictured in a grid.
March 29, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

Salvia is one of the groups of plants that everyone should have in their landscape. This plant group has flowers with a wide-ranging color palette and different sizes. Salvias are loved -- by me especially -- because of their ability to attract pollinators, butterflies and hummingbirds.

A field of orange and yellow marigolds.
March 29, 2021 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Plant Diseases, Trees, Vegetable Gardens

If you’re anything like me, I find any excuse to get outside. The warmer temperatures and colorful blooms are refreshing, especially after the cold winter we had! Working on outdoor chores is a great excuse to get some fresh air. Here are a few tasks you need to cross off your checklist during April:

Clusters of round, red fruit and black fruit are held above black leaves.
March 22, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

Some of my favorite late-summer annuals are the ornamental peppers. These tough plants have to survive the heat and humidity of our Mississippi summers before they become the stars of my summer landscape.

Yellow and purple flowers bloom from a green plant.
March 15, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

We had another great weather weekend in the garden, and  I spent a couple of days catching up on getting my Urban Nano Farm ready for spring. I’m almost finished repairing my fence after it was redesigned by Hurricane Zeta last year

A tall, thick layer of mulch around the base of a tree.
March 8, 2021 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape and Garden Design, Landscape Plants and Trees Diseases

The glorious gardening weekend we just enjoyed was certainly welcome after the recent cold weather that kept us out of the landscape.

I took advantage of the perfect weather and started on garden chores I’ve been putting off. My main accomplishment, which has been on my list for a while, was putting down fresh layers of mulch. It felt good because I have been accumulating bags of mulch, and the neatly stacked pile was pretty big.

A plant has purple leaves.
March 1, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

After going through that recent cold snap, the glorious weather this past weekend has me wanting spring to get here as fast as possible. Visiting garden centers and seeing all the herb transplants means I just may get my spring wish.

A person using a green manual fertilizer.
February 25, 2021 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Plant Diseases, Trees, Vegetable Gardens

Pat yourself on the back. You made it through the historic February ice storm! The weeklong event probably set you back on your garden chores and likely created more work for you to do. Tidy up any damage and get your spring garden in shape with these garden tasks.

A small clump of hairy-type plant material grows on a tree trunk.
February 22, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Landscape Plants and Trees Diseases

The great winter storm of 2021 is finally over, and now we can finally get out into our gardens to survey the damage. And my goodness: I am getting so many questions about whether this plant or that plant is going to make it.

A container of plants droop under a coating of frost.
February 15, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

I have to admit that I can’t even remember the groundhog’s prediction when he was dragged out of his burrow in Punxsutawney, Pa., on Feb. 2. It seems we have experienced an entire year’s worth of weather conditions since that day.

A person wearing yellow gloves using a pair of loppers to prune roses.
February 10, 2021 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

Video by Michaela Parker

Pruning your rose bushes is one late winter chore you shouldn’t overlook! It’s so easy to neglect yard maintenance, especially during cold weather. Pruning helps shape the bush, remove dead canes, open the center for air flow, and stimulate new growth. 

Pruning any plant can be intimidating at first, but it’s actually quite easy. Before you get started, it’s comforting to know that roses are very forgiving plants. They will grow out of many mistakes you may make. Whew!

A variety of different sized and colored containers rest on a bed of gravel.
February 8, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

You may have figured out by now that I am passionate growing plants in containers. Everything in my coastal Mississippi landscape and garden grows in some form of container. Growing in containers gives me the sense of control I want in the garden.

A small tree has numerous, light brown branches.
February 1, 2021 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

Regardless of what that darn groundhog predicts on Feb. 2, Mississippi gardeners are not going to enjoy an early spring because those prospects have already been dashed by the off and on cold weather.
Another garden disappointment is upon us, as February also marks crape murder season.

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