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News Filed Under Agricultural Economics

Bill Herndon
February 14, 2013 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Community, About Extension

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A veteran agricultural economist and administrator at Mississippi State University was recently honored for his achievements and distinguished service to his profession.

Bill Herndon, who serves as the associate vice president of MSU’s Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine, received the 2013 Southern Agricultural Economics Associate Lifetime Achievement Award.

The award recognizes significant and enduring contributions in scholarship or public service to southern agricultural economics.

January 15, 2013 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A one-day Mississippi Market Ready Training at Mississippi State University can help business owners capitalize on the “buy local” movement.

On Feb. 13, MSU Extension Service experts will discuss current food policy legislation, building relationships with restaurant managers and chefs, proper packaging and labeling, marketing strategies, pricing structures and regulatory concerns.

This workshop will be at the Bost Conference Center from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Doors will open at 8:30 a.m. for coffee and socializing with speakers and colleagues.

Keith Coble
December 20, 2012 - Filed Under: Biofuels, Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A team of Mississippi State University agricultural economists recently received funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to study policies impacting biofuel supply chains.

Mississippi's poultry industry ended the year with a preliminary estimated value of $2.5 billion, holding on to the top spot among agricultural commodities in the state for 2012. Broiler values saw a 7 percent increase from 2011, while estimated egg and chicken values remained level. (MSU Ag Communications/file photo
December 13, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Poultry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Poultry again took the top spot among Mississippi’s agricultural commodities for 2012, with a preliminary estimated value of $2.5 billion.

The total estimated value of poultry increased from 2011 by 6.2 percent. Broilers gained 7 percent in value, while eggs and chickens stayed level with 2011’s values.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with Mississippi State University’s Extension Service, said poultry values for 2012 are higher than 2011 values and have increased every year for the past five years.

Mississippi 2012 Estimated Value of Ag Production
December 13, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Corn, Cotton, Grains, Rice, Sweet Potatoes, Soybeans, Agricultural Economics, Forages, Livestock, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Forestry, Catfish

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Significant production levels and high market prices combined to give Mississippi’s agricultural commodities over $7 billion in total value.

Mississippi State University agricultural economists gathered preliminary data from crop production reports, world agricultural supply and demand estimates, industry resources and U.S. Department of Agriculture outlook reports. They predict a $7.3 billion annual value of the state’s top crops, excluding government payments. Final figures will be available in the spring of 2013.

October 29, 2012 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A Mississippi State University agricultural economist will be a featured speaker at a special workshop on laws and regulations affecting row crop producers.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with the MSU Extension Service, will speak at “What You Should Know: Laws and Regulations Affecting Row Crow Producers,” an event focused on crop insurance, the Farm Bill reauthorization and environmental regulations. The workshop, hosted by the National Agricultural Law Center, will be from 10 a.m. to noon Nov. 1 at the Clarksdale Train Station in Clarksdale.

October 15, 2012 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Owners and operators of the state’s agricultural businesses now have more agricultural economists to consult through the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

James Barnes and Brian Williams are located on MSU’s main campus in Starkville. Larry Falconer is based out of MSU’s Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville.

Rice harvest should be fully under way by mid-August. Gant and Sons Farms in Merigold was harvesting fields Aug. 8. (Photo by DREC Communications/Rebekah Ray)
August 10, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops, Rice

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The bright spot for Mississippi’s smaller-than-normal rice crop is that it is looking good at harvest, thanks to an early start and a favorable growing season.

Nathan Buehring, rice specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said most of the state’s rice was planted by mid-April, putting it about two weeks ahead of schedule.

“Everything so far looks good,” Buehring said. “This is one of the earliest planted crops we have ever had, and we’ll be heavy into harvest by the middle of August.”

July rains have helped Mississippi forages rebound from the June drought, but now producers need to watch for invasions of army worms, like this one working on new growth in an Oktibbeha County pasture on July 20, 2012. (Photo by MSU Plant and Soil Sciences/Rocky Lemus)
July 20, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Livestock, Crops

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Pictures of wilting corn in the Midwest may dominate the evening news, but the 2012 drought is also shrinking livestock’s profit potential nationwide.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with Mississippi State University’s Extension Service, said the drought means livestock, dairy and aquaculture producers will continue to see higher feed prices.

Recent high temperatures and a lack of rain have been harder on crops without irrigation than those with it. Many Mississippi farms are watered through pivot irrigation systems. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Marco Nicovich)
July 13, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops

MISSISSIPPI STATE – An ideal growing season through mid-June turned into a hot and dry situation that stressed the state’s crops until widespread rains came after the Fourth of July.

The state has experienced very hot and dry weather in the last several weeks, but Mississippi State University experts remain optimistic about the overall potential.

Trent Irby, soybean specialist with the MSU Extension Service, said 90 percent of the state’s soybean crop was in the reproductive growth phase by the second week of July.

May 10, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Farming, Agri-business, Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A date has been added to the free Mississippi Market Ready training series to help food producers learn how to sell their products directly to restaurant chefs and retail managers.

On July 19 in Biloxi, Mississippi State University Extension Service experts will discuss current food policy legislation, building relationships with restaurant managers and chefs, proper packaging and labeling, marketing strategies, pricing structures and regulatory concerns.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasts Mississippi farmers to plant 1.75 million acres of soybeans, down by 70,000 acres in 2011. This will mark the third consecutive year of reduced soybean acreage in the state. Soybeans remain the leader in the state's planted acreage. (2011 Photo by Kat Lawrence)
March 30, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Crop rotation benefits and market prices remain the driving forces behind farmers’ planting decisions.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s prospective plantings report, released March 30, forecasts 4.67 million acres planted in nine Mississippi crops, an increase of 3 percent from total acreage in 2011.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with Mississippi State University’s Extension Service, said farmers probably are making their decisions to plant or not to plant soybeans and corn based on rotational needs.

November 14, 2011 - Filed Under: Agri-business, Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A free Mississippi Market Ready training will be held in three locations to help food producers learn how to sell their products directly to restaurant chefs and retail managers.

Mississippi State University Extension Service experts will discuss current food policy legislation, building relationships with restaurant managers and chefs, proper packaging and labeling, marketing strategies, pricing structures and regulatory concerns.

November 10, 2011 - Filed Under: Agri-business, Community, Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Local products have great appeal as holiday gifts because of their uniqueness, and finding new ideas and new sources has never been easier than with the online tool Mississippi MarketMaker.

MarketMaker is a free online service that exists to connect “willing markets and quality sources of food from farm and fisheries to fork in Mississippi.”

Many Mississippi cooks have turned their favorite recipes into retail products with information from Mississippi State University's business and Extension Service experts. (Photo by Kat Lawrence)
October 20, 2011 - Filed Under: Agri-business, Agricultural Economics, Food

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi’s talented cooks who want to turn their passion into a business can improve their chances of success with tips from the experts.

Anna Hood, Extension professor in Mississippi State University’s Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion, has coordinated the Food as a Business conference since 1996.

A spread-out planting season means the state's soybean crop will be harvested from early September until the end of October. (file photo)
September 16, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops, Soybeans

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Tropical Storm Lee brought rain across the state Labor Day weekend with mixed results -- mostly good -- for the state’s soybean crop.

Rain that weekend ranged from a few hundredths of an inch in northwest Mississippi to as many as 10 inches in some soybean-growing areas. Whether it brought much-needed moisture to dry fields at an ideal time or halted harvest depended on when the crop was planted.

Mike Steede, pictured with his nephew Gunter, and his family operate a community supported agriculture program on land their family has farmed for over a century.
August 25, 2011 - Filed Under: Commercial Horticulture, Fruit, Agri-business, Family, Food, Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippians who want the freshest blueberries and butterbeans have more options as community-supported agriculture programs increase.

Kimberly Morgan, an agricultural economist and professor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said Mississippians are participating in a trend that began within the past 20 years.

August 24, 2011 - Filed Under: Agri-business, Economic Development, Food, Agricultural Economics

MISSISSIPPI STATE – New owners of food businesses can take part in an upcoming workshop to help improve their odds of success, even during the current economic challenges.

“Food as a Business” is a day-long video conference Oct. 4 with satellite locations at Mississippi State University, Hattiesburg, Raymond, Verona and Cleveland. The $40 registration fee covers snacks during breaks, lunch and conference materials. The registration deadline is Sept. 23.

July 15, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops, Corn

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi farmers planted another large corn crop, but this year’s corn is suffering from lack of rain.

This season’s plantings are spread over a wide time window because of frequent rainfall north Mississippi. The majority of the crop in the Delta and south Mississippi was planted during late March, but plantings in northern counties were delayed well into May.

May 20, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops, Rice

STONEVILLE -- Fields along the Mississippi River may be flooded, but the majority of the state’s rice crop is farther inland and needs either more water or time to dry after heavy rains caused other rivers to overflow.

Nathan Buehring, rice specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said rice fields do not need to be flooded until after the plants are about 6 inches tall. Farmers often will “flush” water over the field to prompt early growth.

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