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Timber Harvest

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Pine trees surround a small clearing in a Mississippi forest.
December 18, 2019 - Filed Under: Forestry, Forestry Impacts, Marketing, Timber Prices, Forest Management, Timber Harvest

Mississippi’s timber industry remained its second highest producing agricultural commodity again in 2019.

Coming in with an estimated production value of $1.15 billion, timber followed the state’s poultry industry, which generated an estimated value of $2.78 billion in 2019. Timber’s value of production is estimated by monthly severance taxes collected by the Mississippi Department of Revenue.

January 31, 2019 - Filed Under: Forestry, Forest Management, Beginning Forestry, Timber Harvest

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The Mississippi State University Extension Service invites private landowners to a workshop to learn about the benefits prescribed burns provide for wildlife habitat.

The prescribed burning workshop will be held at the Black Prairie Wildlife Management Area in Crawford, Mississippi, on Feb. 15 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

This forest has hundreds of tall, thin pine trees with light-gray bark and green clumps of needles.
August 31, 2018 - Filed Under: 4-H Forestry, Forest Management, Timber Harvest

Housing start fluctuations and an abundance of timber are limiting the ceiling on stumpage prices in Mississippi now, but expect the market to improve when sawmills begin stocking up for winter.

 Forestry year-end harvest values from 1940 through 2017, 1940 = $27.3 million, 1950 = $117.5 million, 1960 = $66.8 million, 1970 = $122.6 million, 1980 = $525.5 million, 1990 = $737.5 million, 2000 = $1.3 billion, 2010 = $1 billion, 2017 = $1.4 billion
December 19, 2017 - Filed Under: Forestry, Forestry Impacts, Marketing, Timber Prices, Forest Pests, Timber Harvest

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Despite a slow housing market and other lingering effects of the recession, Mississippi’s forests remain the state’s second most valuable agricultural commodity for 2017.

John Auel, an assistant Extension professor of forestry at Mississippi State University, estimates the value of forest products is $1.4 billion, which is a decrease of 8.6 percent from 2016. However, 2017 numbers are almost 40 percent higher than they were in 2009, when the industry experienced its lowest valued harvest of the 2007-2009 recession.

With a new sawmill in central Mississippi and the prospect of more being built, timber plots like this one at Coontail Farm in Aberdeen will be a good investment long-term despite middling timber market conditions now. (File photo by MSU Extension Service/Kevin Hudson)
August 25, 2017 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The combination of a middling timber market, a pine beetle infestation and wet weather is doing Mississippi tree farmers no favors this year.

Fortunately, a new sawmill in the state and the prospect of increased manufacturing gives reason for optimism long-term.

Biewer Sawmill began operations this year in Newton. Glenn Hughes, a forestry professor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said this indicates an upswing for the state’s forest product industry.

Success Stories

A young man with a metal construction hat and bright orange vest stands in front of his work site with his hands tucked into his blue jeans.
Natural Resources, Forestry, Timber Harvest
Volume 5 Number 1

Logging is more than a job to Drew Massey. It’s in his blood. He is a fifth-generation logger.  (Photo by Kevin Hudson)

A white-haired male wearing a denim shirt and jeans stands beside a tree and smiles.
Lawn and Garden, Trees, Natural Resources, Forestry, Forest Economics, Timber Prices, Forest Management, Agroforestry, Timber Harvest
Volume 4 Number 3

During his tenure as an engineer at Boeing, Ottis Bullock helped build machines that went into the air and to the moon, but he always had an interest in the trees that grew from the ground where he came of age.

ECTO Apps

Filed Under: Forestry, Forest Management, Longleaf Pine, Timber Harvest
App type: Android
Stand Density Index (SDI) is used to help determine if a pine planation is in need of thinning. Pine Thin uses the average number of trees per acre and the average diameter at breast height (DBH) of trees in your plantation to determine if a thinning is needed. Specific density management diagrams have been developed for each of the four major southern pine species (loblolly pine, shortleaf pine, longleaf pine, and slash pine).

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Your Extension Experts

Portrait of Dr. Randy Rousseau
Extension/Research Professor
Portrait of Dr. Brady Self
Associate Extension Professor