You are here

Annual Flowering Plants in Mississippi

No other group of flowering plants provides as much color as quickly and economically as annuals. Annual plants sprout from seed, flower, set seed, and die within one season. Many flowers, vegetables, and herbs are planted every year as annuals. Other plants may live longer in their native lands, but do not survive the heat or cold of the mid-south and are best treated as annuals.

Most annuals are planted in spring and are killed by frost in the fall. However, some, including pansies, ornamental cabbage, and dill are tolerant of our winters and are best planted in the fall for color throughout the winter. These are usually killed by the heat of early summer.

Columbines, such as this Aquilegia Swan blue and white, can thrive in Mississippi landscapes when treated as an annual.Some annuals, such as gomphrena, cosmos, and coreopsis reseed themselves, yielding several years of pleasure with minimal care. Annuals come in a variety of colors, heights, and textures, and their uses are almost unlimited. Unbeatable in masses of solid or mixed colors, annuals are also very effective in small groups or used to soften lines and accent borders.

Many annuals, especially compact varieties, are well suited for containers. Large annuals may be used as specimen or accent plants along the back of a flower or shrub border. Some annuals are vines that may be grown on fences, arbors, porch rails, or trellises.

Annuals are inexpensive, especially when grown from seed. However, they do require soil preparation, fertilization, irrigation, weeding, and pest control. Most are native to semiarid regions of the world and require full sunshine to survive.

Species such as impatiens are native to dark woodland floors and flourish in shady sites, such as covered patios, narrow courtyards, or heavily wooded sites.

Annual gardens are easily established in the smallest and most restrictive of spaces as well as the harsh conditions of a large suburban garden. Their relatively shallow root systems require only a modest amount of soil. Gardeners with sizable yards quickly learn the trick of planting one or two easy-to-grow beds of massed annuals to decorate patios, walks, or pools. Apartment dwellers can achieve a splash of color with a few well-placed pots, wash tubs, or planter boxes of annuals.

Annuals that need full sun, such as periwinkle and marigold, grow and flower best when they receive at least 4 to 6 hours of direct sunlight each day. Woodland species perform best under partial to heavy shade.

Prevent root diseases and other problems associated with waterlogged soil by avoiding areas where water stands after a heavy rain. Also avoid areas near large trees and shrubs that may have many greedy, thirsty feeder roots.

See more about annual flowering plants:

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

News

Massive clusters of yellow flowers cause stems to arch downward.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens November 21, 2022

As we enter winter, many gardeners consider this a less interesting outdoor season compared to the warmer spring and summer seasons. To add color, we depend on cool-season annuals like dianthuses, pansies, violas, and the various kales and cabbages. Of course, we’re also entering camellia season, but that’s really about it.

A greenhouse is full of poinsettias in a variety of red, yellow, orange and pink colors.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens November 11, 2022

Although it’s only mid-November, poinsettias will be arriving very soon at garden centers -- some may have already arrived -- for the holiday and Christmas season. In many people’s minds, the traditional poinsettia color is red. And let’s face it: A red poinsettia is beautiful. My favorite continues to be the traditional red. But red is not the only color available.

A large, red flower is surrounded by smaller, red and white flowers.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens November 7, 2022

I’ve always enjoyed the fall season in the landscape and garden. I find the moderating temperatures refreshing, which helps me get my second wind when taking care of gardening chores. Many of our summer annuals seem to feel the same way about the reinvigorating fall weather. In fact, I think these summer annuals actually look their best in the fall. There is no better example of this than zinnias grown in the fall.

collage of cornucopia designs
Filed Under: Food and Health, Food, Lawn and Garden, Cut Flowers and Houseplants, Floral Design, Flower Gardens October 31, 2022

The cornucopia, or horn of plenty, is most often associated with Thanksgiving. It is generally depicted with the fruits of harvest overflowing its horn-shaped form and serves as a reminder to be thankful and grateful. If you like do-it-yourself projects, making your own cornucopia is an easy project.

A yellow bloom has a delicate blue edge.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 31, 2022

Now is the time to plant one of the great, classic cool-season annuals. While they have a dainty look, violas are tough plants that will perform through the fall, winter and into the spring landscape and garden seasons. Violas go by either of the botanical names Viola tricolor or Viola cornuta, but most gardeners I know call them by their common name, Johnny jump ups.

Success Stories

A group of teens examining a plant with a teacher.
Community, Rural Development, Food and Health, Health, AIM for CHangE, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Youth Gardening
Volume 8 Number 3

When teachers and administrators at Leland School Park began taking steps to install a school garden in 2019, they had no idea they would get a first-of-its-kind outdoor classroom.

A woman wearing a white shirt with red and blue stars holds a potted plant in a garden.
Leadership, Community, Master Gardener, Flower Gardens
Volume 8 Number 3

The annual Christmas Cactus Showcase in Brooksville each December features anywhere from 45 to 60 colorful cacti, most of which are under the year-round care of Pat Hill.

Hummingbird.
Flower Gardens, Natural Resources, Environment, Water, Water Quality, Wildlife
Volume 7 Number 2

Popular post

Hummingbird migration information reached more than 400,000 on Facebook, thanks to this post highlighting the featured Extension for Real Life blog post.

A young woman with an older man and woman standing next to a tomato plant.
Greenhouse Tomatoes, Farming, Flower Gardens
Volume 2 Number 3

Nursery using Extension publications to host workshops, reach new customers

Business continues to blossom at Jackson Farms in Bassfield, and one reason may be because the family-owned nursery connects with its clientele in ways that its big-box competition does not.

Arboretum.
Commercial Horticulture, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens
Volume 2 Number 3

Celebrating Arboretum Excellence

The Mississippi State University Crosby Arboretum in Picayune received the 2016 Garden Excellence Award from the American Public Gardens Association.

Watch

Colorful Crotons
Southern Gardening

Colorful Crotons

Sunday, October 31, 2021 - 5:00am
Colorful Coleus
Southern Gardening

Colorful Coleus

Sunday, October 24, 2021 - 5:00am
Mums and Mari-Mums
Southern Gardening

Mums and Mari-Mums

Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 5:00am
Gardening Rain Delay
Southern Gardening

Gardening Rain Delay

Sunday, October 10, 2021 - 5:00am
Luscious Lantana
Southern Gardening

Luscious Lantana

Sunday, October 3, 2021 - 5:00am

Listen

Friday, July 3, 2020 - 6:00am
Thursday, July 2, 2020 - 6:00am
Wednesday, July 1, 2020 - 6:00am
Monday, June 29, 2020 - 6:00am
Friday, June 26, 2020 - 6:00am

Select Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Portrait of Dr. Gary R. Bachman
Extension/Research Professor
Ornamental Horticulture Host of Southern Gardening