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Vegetable Gardening in Mississippi

Successive Planting

Gardening in Mississippi provides the opportunity to have something in the garden almost every month of the year.

The long growing season combined with successive plantings (growing more than one vegetable in the same space during the year) enables gardeners to reduce the size of their gardens.

As soon as one vegetable is harvested, clear the space and prepare to plant another vegetable. Empty row space produces nothing and provides a place for weeds to grow, while a small garden intensively planted and managed can be very productive.

For example, follow a spring planting of English peas with a late spring planting of cucumbers; then replant the space with fall bush snap beans, leafy greens, or late southern peas.

Another example is to follow early sweet corn with winter squash and pumpkins in early July. Spring Irish potatoes can be followed by lima beans or southern peas, which are followed by fall greens.

Practice crop rotation (planting nonrelated plants in the same location in successive plantings) where garden space permits. Crop rotation is a good practice to follow when you use the same garden site for several years because it helps prevent the buildup of diseases in the garden soil.

Related Vegetable Groups

Tomato
Eggplant
Irish Potato
Pepper

 

Snap Bean
Lima Bean
Peanut
Southern Pea

 

Cucumber
Squash
Pumpkin
Muskmelon
Watermelon

Cabbage
Broccoli
Turnip
Mustard
Collard


When growing only for fresh use, make small successive plantings of vegetables like snap beans, sweet corn, lettuce, radishes, leafy greens, and southern peas. Planting at 2-week intervals provides continuous fresh vegetables.

Plant only as much as your family can eat before the next planting begins to produce. If you plan to can and freeze as well as use fresh vegetables, plant more vegetables at one time to provide enough at harvest for preserving.

Expected yields are given for the different vegetables in the Planting Guide on page 7. Keep in mind that the yields given for some vegetables (tomatoes, peppers, okra, pole beans, and eggplant, for example) are for multiple harvests over a period of time.

Vegetables with extended harvest periods require only one planting during the season. However, with tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant, a second planting made in midsummer provides good quality vegetables for harvest in fall.

A second planting of okra, about 6 weeks after the first planting, has some benefit for late-season harvest, but you can get the same benefit by cutting the first planting back to a height of 3 to 4 feet in late summer.

Plant your garden according to a detailed plan on paper. A finished garden plan shows these things:

  • what vegetables to grow
  • number of different plantings of each vegetable
  • time and location of each planting
  • distance each row is to be planted from one end of the garden.