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Employment Opportunities

Available job postings and positions are listed on the Mississippi State University Human Resources Management Web site.

 

MSU Extension: Equal Opportunity & Education for All

The Mississippi State University Extension Service, as a part of MSU and in partnership with state, county and federal governments, is the educational arm of the United States Department of Agriculture. Our collective goal is to deliver educational programming to all program participants in an effective and nondiscriminatory manner.

MSU-Extension's outreach efforts are provided in areas related to Agriculture and Natural Resources, 4-H Youth Development, Family and Consumer Education and Enterprise and Community Resource Development. We strive to deliver to clients and customers research-proven information through a variety of innovative teaching techniques. Headquartered at Mississippi State University, Extension's faculty and staff members are also located in each of the eighty-two counties of Mississippi and four Research and Extension Centers.

With a targeted audience of over two million Mississippi citizens, MSU-Extension prohibits discrimination in all programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, and marital or family status. MSU-Extension is also an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

 

How does Extension promote diversity?

Extension works diligently to promote diversity in both its program and workforce efforts. Understanding the power of diverse thinking, teamwork and leadership, Extension's efforts in diversity are fostered throughout the organization.

Program planning is a key element of Extension's programming thrust. Advisory Councils are one of the primary means by which Extension identifies programming needs for local citizens. Advisory councils are organized in all areas of Extension's programming and in each of Mississippi's eighty-two counties. Each county has an Overall Extension advisory council and each county programming area has commodity councils and/or advisory groups for each major area of programming. Counties also organize at-large advisory committees for their area of county programming. Extension personnel in each county solicit input from key community leaders for advice on membership selection. One characteristic of county advisory councils' membership includes the need to reflect the make-up of the targeted population in the county and area served. Consideration is given to organizing councils whose membership is diverse regarding race, sex, socio-economic status and geographic locations. These councils serve as a means of accessing grass roots input for local programming needs for both traditional clients and potential customers. Advisory council members are an additional tool used by Extension to actively engage other county citizens in needs assessment and program dissemination.

Diversity is a key component within Extension 4-H and Homemaker's clubs. Traditionally, these clubs operated without concerns for increasing diversity. Now, Extension county staffs, club presidents and leaders ensure that clubs located in integrated communities operate in a non-discriminatory way. To facilitate this action, clubs provide open recruitment drives to promote and solicit new and diverse membership and to ensure that everyone interested can participate in educational programs..

As a means of encouraging Extension employees to provide equitable training for all segments of the population, training and incentives have been incorporated into Extension's diversity program. Annually, Extension presents cash awards and plaques to an individual and a group of individuals who displayed the most innovated programming in diversity regarding program planning, implementation and delivery. Extension personnel utilize the input and assistance from key minority leaders and other grass roots organizations and individuals to annually target programs for minorities and other under-represented, under-served customers. As a result of these efforts, Extension's programming has reached more of Mississippi's targeted non-traditional clients.

Employment is another area of diversity that Extension focuses on. With its goal of having a workforce resembling the potential customers served, several actions have been implemented to ensure this goal is accomplished. Recruitment is one of the major elements of Extension's workforce diversity. With the number of college graduates completing degrees in agriculture and related subjects declining, efforts to recruit outstanding employees for Extension's already diverse workforce is a major concern. Utilizing recruitment teams and individuals, Extension recruits from Mississippi State University in addition to other in-state Universities who offer degrees in agriculture and related fields. Extension also recruits from regional state universities including historically black institutions of higher education. Additionally, recruitment team members participate in national career fairs where appropriate.

MSU-Extension Service has made several accomplishments in diversity. Our continued goal is to develop a multicultural organization that provides effective programs for all Mississippians.

 

What efforts are made by Extension to assist the disabled?

Extension seeks to disseminate research based information to all citizens equitably. In an effort to heighten delivery of programs to the disabled and other under-served customers, Extension has implemented several strategies within the framework of the American with Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audio-tape, etc) should contact their local county Extension office. Also, you should contact your local county Extension office or the person in charge of the program if accommodations are needed which would enable participation in educational meetings more fully.

Applicants and employees with a qualified disability who need an accommodation to more fully participate in employment opportunities should contact the person in charge of the activity or their supervisor.

If requests are not honored or additional concerns exist regarding accommodations, you may also contact the Extension Civil Rights/EEO coordinator, the Extension director or USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600.

 

Can Extension provide assistance to private groups and private organizations?

Extension operates within guidelines which promote a nondiscrimination policy. Within these guidelines, providing continuous services to private groups or private organizations depends upon an assurance statement where the presiding official of the private group attests that their policies are nondiscriminatory. Upon this signature, the group can receive the benefits of Extension.

 

What action should be taken to express a concern or to file a program complaint?

Extension is very much interested in learning of individual's concerns and/or complaints. Our goal is to resolve concerns and complaints in an informal way. Usually, the party issuing the concern/complaint discussing the matter with the party to which the concern/complaint is lodged can accomplish resolution. Additionally, if resolution cannot be obtained with the alleged party involved, a discussion with their immediate supervisor is appropriate. Feel free at any time during the informal resolution process to contact the Extension Director.

To file a formal program complaint of discrimination, you may write the Director of Extension, Box 9601, Mississippi State, MS 39762, phone (662) 325-3036, or Extension's Civil Rights Coordinator, Box 9660, Mississippi State, MS, phone (662) 325-3462. You can also file a complaint by writing USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W,Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or by calling (202) 720-5964.